01 March, 2007

Capacior Transient Response

Because capacitors store energy in the form of an electric field, they tend to act like small secondary-cell batteries, being able to store and release electrical energy. A fully discharged capacitor maintains zero volts across its terminals, and a charged capacitor maintains a steady quantity of voltage across its terminals, just like a battery. When capacitors are placed in a circuit with other sources of voltage, they will absorb energy from those sources, just as a secondary-cell battery will become charged as a result of being connected to a generator. A fully discharged capacitor, having a terminal voltage of zero, will initially act as a short-circuit when attached to a source of voltage, drawing maximum current as it begins to build a charge. Over time, the capacitor's terminal voltage rises to meet the applied voltage from the source, and the current through the capacitor decreases correspondingly. Once the capacitor has reached the full voltage of the source, it will stop drawing current from it, and behave essentially as an open-circuit.

When a battery is connected to a series resistor and capacitor, the initial current is high as the battery transports charge from one plate of the capacitor to the other. The charging current asymptotically approaches zero as the capacitor becomes charged up to the battery voltage. Charging the capacitor stores energy in the electric field between the capacitor plates. The rate of charging is typically described in terms of a time constant RC.



Example :




When the switch is first closed, the voltage across the capacitor (which we were told was fully discharged) is zero volts; thus, it first behaves as though it were a short-circuit. Over time, the capacitor voltage will rise to equal battery voltage, ending in a condition where the capacitor behaves as an open-circuit. Current through the circuit is determined by the difference in voltage between the battery and the capacitor, divided by the resistance of 10 kΩ. As the capacitor voltage approaches the battery voltage, the current approaches zero. Once the capacitor voltage has reached 15 volts, the current will be exactly zero. Let's see how this works using real values:




The capacitor voltage's approach to 15 volts and the current's approach to zero over time is what a mathematician would call asymptotic: that is, they both approach their final values, getting closer and closer over time, but never exactly reaches their destinations. For all practical purposes, though, we can say that the capacitor voltage will eventually reach 15 volts and that the current will eventually equal zero.

Equations for RC Circuits :
Time constant = Tc = RC


For more details of this topic visit the below sites :http://www.allaboutcircuits.com/vol_1/chpt_16/2.html
http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/electric/capchg.html#c1
http://www.aplac.hut.fi/courses/bee/exercises.pdf

No comments: